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Workshops
List of workshops
Workshops descriptions
Workshops registration rates

The CDC 2015 is offering six full-day and two half-day pre-conference workshops on Monday, December 14, 2015, addressing current and future topics in control systems from experts from academia, research institutes, and industry.

Pre-registration for these workshops is strongly encouraged. To pre-register, please visit the conference registration page. Questions can be directed to the Workshops Chair, Professor Graziano Chesi (chesi@eee.hku.hk).

The workshops will be offered based on viable attendance. Please note that workshops are (a) subject to cancellation for lack of registrants, and (b) subject to capacity limits.

The full-day workshops will start at 9:00AM and will end at 6:00PM; half-day workshops will start at 2:00PM and will end at 6:00PM.

The workshops registration rates can be found here. In the registration system, please use the codes such as #F1 and #H1 to specify the workshop you plan to attend.

STUDENTS: The Control Systems Society is providing support for an initiative to allow students, who register for the conference, to also register for a workshop at strongly discounted rates. The first 100 IEEE-CSS student members who register for a workshop will receive educational support from the society to reduce their registration to 3,000 JPY (full day workshop) and 1,800 JPY (half day workshop). This fee is non-refundable (with the exception of workshop cancellation). The number of available student registrations per workshop will be limited and registration will be provided on a first come first serve basis, so early registration through the conference registration page is highly recommended.

Please note that only people who have registered for the conference can register for the workshops.


List of Workshops Offered at the 54th CDC

Full-Day Workshops (9:00AM - 6:00PM)

Distributed Autonomy and Human-Machine Networks
Jeff Shamma (KAUST), John Baras (University of Maryland)
Room 801

Game- and Control-Theoretic Methods for Secure Cyber-Physical Systems
Andrew Clark (Worcester Polytechnic Institute), Quanyan Zhu (New York University)
Room 1004

Half Century of Progress in Systems and Control Theory: A Workshop Dedicated to A. Stephen Morse's 75th Birthday
Joao P. Hespanha (University of California, Santa Barbara), Ji Liu (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign)
Room 802

Hand-Shaking Advanced Control in Marine Robotics Applications
THIS WORKSHOP HAS BEEN CANCELED. Individuals who registered can either receive a full refund or transfer their registration to another workshop.

Smart Cities: Service Models, Vulnerabilities, and Resilience
Lillian J. Ratliff (University of California, Berkeley), Roy Dong (University of California, Berkeley), Henrik Ohlsson (Linkoping University), Samuel A. Burden (University of California, Berkeley), Hui Liu (Shanghai Jiao Tong University), Radha Poovendran (University of Washington), and S. Shankar Sastry (University of California, Berkeley)
Room 1005

Towards Scalable Formal Synthesis of Complex Systems
Majid Zamani (Technische Universitat Munchen), Antoine Girard (Universite Joseph Fourier), Alessandro Abate (University of Oxford)
Room 804

Half-Day Workshops (2:00PM - 6:00PM)

Nonlinear Optimal Control: Stable Manifold Approach
Noboru Sakamoto (Nanzan University), Gou Nishida (Tokyo Institute of Technology)
Room 1006

Taxonomies of Interconnected Systems: Partial and Imperfect Information in Multi-Agent Networks
Andrea Gasparri (University Roma Tre), Ryan Williams (University of Southern California), Magnus Egerstedt (Georgia Institute of Technology)
Room 1007

Workshops Descriptions

Distributed Autonomy and Human-Machine Networks

Organizers: Jeff Shamma (KAUST), John Baras (University of Maryland)

Speakers: John Baras (University of Maryland), Magnus Egerstedt (Georgia Institute of Technology), Eric Feron (Georgia Tech), Vaibhav Srivastava/Naomi Leonard (Princeton University), Jason Marden (University of Colorado at Boulder), Nuno Martins (University of Maryland), Heinrich Nax (Ecole Normale Superieure), Ketan Savla (University of Southern California), Jeff Shamma (KAUST), Behrouz Touri (University of Colorado at Boulder)

Room 801

Abstract: Technological advancements in sensing, communications, and embedded computation have led to a world of increasingly complex and interconnected systems. Future intelligent infrastructure systems in application domains such as energy, transportation, communication, or even the internet-of-things, will involve networks of devices that not only are sensing but also reacting to an evolving environment. Two primary challenges to the design of such systems are (i) distributed autonomy, in which no single entity has full information or capacity to induce collective coordination, and (ii) human-machine interaction, in which a complex network is comprised of both devices and humans. Motivated by the ongoing and increasing interest in these topics, the workshop will discuss distributed autonomy with an emphasis on human modeling and networked human-machine interaction. The workshop will consist of four sessions entitled:

  • Distributed autonomy;
  • Modeling group decisions;
  • Modeling individual decisions;
  • Focus on transportation networks.
Talks will present a combination of tutorial material, recent work, and future challenges in a broadly accessible manner. These sessions are in addition to an initial motivating presentation and a concluding future direction discussion. The list of speakers includes both junior and senior researchers and reflects a varied background in systems and controls as well as economics and computer science.

Target Audience: Researchers, both junior and senior, with an interest in distributed decision architectures comprised of human decision makers and (semi-)autonomous systems.

Webpage: http://risc.kaust.edu.sa/Pages/CDCworkshop.aspx

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Game- and Control-Theoretic Methods for Secure Cyber-Physical Systems

Organizers: Andrew Clark (Worcester Polytechnic Institute), Quanyan Zhu (New York University)

Speakers: Tamer Basar (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), Linda Bushnell (Network Security Lab), Radha Poovendran (Network Security Lab), Andrew Clark (Worcester Polytechnic Institute), Quanyan Zhu (New York University)

Room 1004

Abstract: Cyber-physical systems (CPS) are characterized by tight integration of cyber (computation and communication) components with physical systems. The CPS paradigm is expected to transform critical sectors of society including energy, health care, and transportation. The integration of cyber systems, however, creates new entry points for cyber attacks, which degrade the availability of the physical system, disrupt the communication protocols needed for coordinated control, and compromise the safety and performance of physical components. Security of CPS poses an inherently multi-disciplinary research challenge. Network and systems security is needed to discover possible cyber vulnerabilities and develop secure protocols. The incentives, capabilities, and goals of adversary must be understood and modeled, through techniques including game theory. The CPS control actions should be robust to the impact of possible attacks and enable recovery of system functionality when attacks do occur. The proposed workshop will present a holistic view of CPS security, with perspectives on network security, game theory, and control, as well as a view for how these disciplines can be combined to design resilient, safe, and secure CPS. An important topic will be describing the adversary's actions in the same game- and control-theoretic language as the physical system dynamics, which enables descriptive modeling and effective mitigation of the attack.

Target Audience: The target audience consists of graduate students, researchers, and practitioners from industry, academia, and government, interested in security of CPS, as well as game- and control-theoretic methodologies for security. There are no prerequisites to attend the workshop.

Webpage: https://wp.nyu.edu/cdc2015workshop/

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Half Century of Progress in Systems and Control Theory: A Workshop Dedicated to A. Stephen Morse's 75th Birthday

Organizers: Joao P. Hespanha (University of California, Santa Barbara), Ji Liu (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign)

Speakers: Brian D. O. Anderson (Australian National University), John Baillieul (Boston University), Tamer Basar (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), Mohamed Ali Belabbas (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), Francesco Bullo (University of California, Santa Barbara), Ming Cao (University of Groningen), Edward J. Davison (University of Toronto), Tryphon T. Georgiou (University of Minnesota), Alberto Isidori (University of Rome), Ali Jadbabaie (University of Pennsylvania), Arthur J. Krener (Naval Postgraduate School), Daniel M. Liberzon (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), Anders Lindquist (Shanghai Jiao Tong University and Royal Institute of Technology), Felipe Pait (University of S Paulo), Yutaka Yamamoto (Kyoto University)

Room 802

Abstract: This workshop is being organized to celebrate Professor A. Stephen Morse's 75th birthday and honor his multiple long-lasting contributions to the field of systems and control theory. This workshop brings together 15 of his colleagues and former students who will present a broad range of contemporary topics in different areas of systems and control theory. The main goal of this workshop is to inspire a future generation of research leaders to pursue work that promotes excellence and will thus likely have a profound impact in the field.

Target Audience: All are welcomed to join this celebration of Professor Morse's 75th birthday.

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Hand-Shaking Advanced Control in Marine Robotics Applications
CANCELED

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Smart Cities: Service Models, Vulnerabilities, and Resilience

Organizers: Lillian J. Ratliff (University of California, Berkeley), Roy Dong (University of California, Berkeley), Henrik Ohlsson (Linkoping University), Samuel A. Burden (University of California, Berkeley), Hui Liu (Shanghai Jiao Tong University), Radha Poovendran (University of Washington), and S. Shankar Sastry (University of California, Berkeley)

Speakers: Nanpeng Yu (University of California, Riverside), Henrik Ohlsson (Linkoping University), Andre Teixeira (Royal Institute of Technology), Shuo Han (University of Pennsylvania), Aron Laszka (Vanderbilt University), Baosen Zhang (University of Washington), Andrew Clark (Worcester Polytechnic Institute), Alvaro Cardenas (University of Texas, Dallas), Howard J. Chizeck (University of Washington)

Room 1005

Abstract: Motivated by economic and technological changes, Smart Cities are being constructed upon intelligent infrastructures spanning energy, health care, and transportation. The advent of these societal-scale infrastructures brings with it new opportunities for improving efficiency while simultaneously exposing novel vulnerabilities. In energy societal-scale cyber-physical systems (S-CPS), for example, smart metering technologies increase the availability of streaming data thereby enabling monetization of energy savings. Such savings can be realized by employing machine learning algorithms to customize offerings to consumers. On the other hand, the availability of this fine-grained consumer/system data and the increased number of access points to the broader system expose new privacy and security risks. The development of a S-CPS design methodology in support of resilient, sustainable operation of Smart Cities necessitates a rigorous analytical and computational framework for analyzing information exchanges between agents and for synthesizing new service models that improve efficiency. This may proceed, for instance, by introducing resilient controls for operations as well as incorporating the use of vulnerability-aware incentives to shape consumer choice, an essential element of operations. This workshop will focus on understanding the industrial landscape, emerging service models, vulnerabilities and policy, and resilience and sustainability.

Target Audience: This workshop is intended to gather individuals from industry and academia, including graduate students, faculty, and researchers, to discuss research in resilient, societal-scale cyber-physical systems. The aim is to understand what problems that are of practical relevance to industry and society and to identify promising directions for future research. The talks will be broadly accessible to attendees of CDC.

Webpage: http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/~roydong/2015_cdc_ws.html

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Towards Scalable Formal Synthesis of Complex Systems

Organizers: Majid Zamani (Technische Universitat Munchen), Antoine Girard (Universite Joseph Fourier), Alessandro Abate (University of Oxford)

Speakers: Alessandro Abate (University of Oxford), Murat Arcak (University of California, Berkeley), Calin Belta (Boston University), Amin Ben Sassi (University of Colorado, Boulder), Domitilla Del Vecchio (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Rudiger Ehlers (University of Bremen), Jie Fu (University of Pennsylvania), Antoine Girard (Universite Joseph Fourier), Necmiye Ozay (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor), Jana Tumova (KTH Royal Institute of Technology), Arjan van der Schaft (University of Groningen), Bo Wu (University of Notre Dame), Majid Zamani (Technische Universitat Munchen)

Room 804

Abstract: The use of concepts, techniques, and algorithms from the literature on formal verification and synthesis in computer science is becoming increasingly common within the systems and control community. Formal notions such as that of abstraction, or that of simulation relation, which are fundamental in computer science, are increasing their presence in the study of dynamical and control systems. Furthermore, such notions help to improve the understanding of similar concepts that are already in use in systems and control theory, such as that of model reduction (abstraction). The concept of formal synthesis stands for the process of automated synthesis of controller codes from higher-level temporal logic requirements. The use of temporal logic allows the expression of rich specifications for time-dependent models, and enables to draw comparisons between themes in classical control theory and their equivalents in computer science. Correspondingly, we invited an interdisciplinary group of control theorists and computer scientists, expert in this domain, to present recently developed scalable formal synthesis techniques. These techniques are particularly relevant to address problems dealing with cyber-physical systems, i.e. systems in which computing devices interact with the physical world and vice versa. These techniques can solve many large-scale complex problems that until recently could not be addressed in a formal methodological way. Furthermore, these approaches have demonstrated their practical relevance with many available model checkers and synthesis tools growing from being exclusively of academic interest to becoming industrially relevant techniques.

Target Audience: The proposed workshop will benefit the control community as well as computer science community. We believe that the potential audience of this workshop consists of a large number of CDC participants especially those interested in formal methods and cyber-physical systems. The workshop will be a unique opportunity for an active and productive interaction between control theorists and computer scientists.

Webpage: http://www.hcs.ei.tum.de/en/workshop

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Nonlinear Optimal Control: Stable Manifold Approach

Organizers: Noboru Sakamoto (Nanzan University), Gou Nishida (Tokyo Institute of Technology)

Speakers: Noboru Sakamoto (Nanzan University), Gou Nishida (Tokyo Institute of Technology)

Room 1006

Abstract: The goal of this half-day workshop is to give an introduction to stable manifold method (SMM) for optimal control for nonlinear systems which has been developed recently. SMM is developed based on a theory of stable manifold for a system of ordinary differential equations and has quite a few advantages over existing computational methods for optimal control. Especially, this workshop introduces Matlab programs that have been developed by the research group of the proposers and shows applications for mechanical and aerospace systems. Many of the applications include experimental results and the issue of controller implementation will be also discussed. The workshop will also discuss a possibility of designing optimal feedback control for systems described by distributed parameter systems as well as non-uniqueness of solutions for HJEs. The workshop consists of three parts: (1) Overviews for optimal control theory, Hamilton-Jacobi equations (HJEs) and the theory of stable manifold (SM). This part includes the computational theory for stable manifold and its implementation. (2) Applications of SMM for mechanical and aerospace systems such as inverted pendulum swing-up and stabilization, automobile control and aircraft control under actuator rate-limit. This part starts the introduction of Matlab program for SMM. It will also discuss an extension of SMM for distributed parameter systems and give comparative studies for existing method for solving HJEs such as Taylor expansion method. (3) This part includes a detail and larger domain analysis for stable manifolds arising from optimal control problems for mechanical systems with strong nonlinearity. As a result it will be shown that the incurvation of SM in associated Hamiltonian systems results in the non-uniqueness of HJE. A computational method for such SM analysis will be also touched on.

Target Audience: Researchers in nonlinear control theory, control engineers, students in control theory and engineering. Especially those who do practice and are interested in application of nonlinear control for real-world problems.

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Taxonomies of Interconnected Systems: Partial and Imperfect Information in Multi-Agent Networks

Organizers: Andrea Gasparri (University Roma Tre), Ryan Williams (University of Southern California), Magnus Egerstedt (Georgia Institute of Technology)

Speakers: Daniel Zelazo (Technion City), Tamer Basar (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), Giuseppe Notarstefano (University of Salento), Fumin Zhang (Georgia Institute of Technology), Magnus Egerstedt (Georgia Institute of Technology), Bruno Sinopoli (Carnegie Mellon University), Naomi Leonard (Princeton University)

Room 1007

Abstract: Interconnected systems have become the focus of intense investigation, primarily due to the promise of adaptability and scalability compared to single-agent solutions. As recent work has demonstrated, investigations are far-reaching across various disciplines, ranging from sampling, tracking, and coverage, mobility and topology control, to general agent agreement problems. As a matter of fact, the study of interconnected systems is remarkably complex and highly susceptible to fragmentation especially due to the diversity of the research communities involved, ranging from computer science to control. Both a high level view of the fundamental topics that drive interconnected systems, and a fine-grained understanding of each topic is required to truly make progress in the field, and to provide an accessible starting point to new research. An effective approach to attain such goals would be to construct a taxonomy of interconnected systems. To this end, we have initiated a series of workshops, each addressing specific topics at the forefront of interconnected system research. For each of these topics, our goal is to identify those properties that underlie crucial, and yet common, aspects of theory and application. We believe that such a taxonomic approach may lead towards an understanding of the current open problems in each subarea, the relationships between subareas, ultimately yielding a roadmap for new researchers connecting theory and application. This proposal represents a further step towards building such a taxonomy after the first three workshops, held at IROS14 (http://asimov.usc.edu/~rkwillia/ws/iros14/), ICRA15 (http://asimov.usc.edu/~rkwillia/ws/icra15/), and ACC15 (http://gasparri.dia.uniroma3.it/ws/acc15/), focused on the implications of topology and asymmetry in collaborative systems. In this workshop, we will focus on the difficulties arising from partial and imperfect information in multi-agent networks. These challenging aspects represent an important area of focus for the control community, especially in recent years, in order to capture a more realistic modeling of interconnected systems. Indeed, typical modes of communication and sensing are often restrictive in their information content, e.g., partial field of view of sensor elements, corrupted or delayed communication, or anisotropic radiation of antennas. Our goal is to develop a taxonomy of control methodologies used to address partial and imperfect information in multi-agent networks and identify the fundamental features and open problems in this challenging setting. As our long-term vision for the series is to truly connect workshop topics, we will incorporate notions of asymmetry and topological control methodologies, to relate to the previous workshops in the series. Finally, we aim to build the series across the control and robotics communities, hopefully establishing a bridge between the future requirements of multi-robot applications and novelties in multi-agent theory.

Target Audience: The goal of this workshop is to gather researchers in the field of multi-agent systems, with particular interest in the implications of partial and imperfect information in multi-agent networks, with expertise spanning network theory and control. We also hope to connect researchers in academia, government, and industry, with interest in beginning the journey towards methodically constructing a taxonomy of interconnected systems.

Webpage: http://gasparri.dia.uniroma3.it/ws/cdc15

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PaperPlaza Submission site

Conference App

Key dates (2015)
Submission Site Opens:January 5
Invited Session
Proposals Due:
March 12
Initial Submissions Due:March 24
Workshop Proposals Due:May 1
Decision Notification:End of July
Registration Opens: August 12
Final Submissions Due: September 15, 2015
September 17, 2015


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